Secrets to CRM implementation success

Secrets to CRM implementation success

CRM has received a lot of negative (and perhaps unfair) press over the years. And there’s no doubt that in some quarters, there still exists a widespread perception that CRM implementation is a risky and excruciatingly painful undertaking.

According to Orson Herbst, product manager with Herbst Software, organisations want to buy and use CRM but successful implementation depends on many factors.

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Social CRM

Social CRM: taking CRM to the next level

We’re probably all familiar with the Pareto Principle as it applies to sales; 80 per cent of business typically comes from 20 per cent of customers.  In fact, research suggests that a five per cent reduction in business lost can generate anything between 25 and 85 per cent additional organisational profit.

It’s perhaps the strongest argument for hanging onto those hard-won customers but is it also a cogent argument for interacting and engaging them on their chosen communications platform?

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CRM

CRM: Putting customer experience at the heart of business

According to recent figures from the CSO’s ‘Information Society Statistics’ report for enterprise, just 32 per cent of organisations are currently using Customer Relationship Management (CRM) tools to manage client activity. Given the relative maturity of the technology – CRM has been around in one guise or another since the 1980s – this is perhaps a surprisingly low figure.

But is the current economic downturn prompting organisations to take a fresh look at how they manage customer contact?

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Email marketing anyone?

Producing, high quality, mobile-ready email templates just got a whole lot easier, thanks to the folks over at Campaignmonitor.

While email has come in for a lot of negative press (primarily due to the abuse of said tool by spammers), email marketing, if planned and executed well, still represents one of the most cost-effective means of communications with your existing customers and prospects.

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Professor Wallace Ewart, head of graduate business school at Griffith College, Dublin

A lifetime of learning

As supply chain management grows in complexity, how well are our supply chain managers trained to deal with the scale of this change?

As organisations scramble to identify potential sources of competitive advantage, the role of the supply chain manager has grown in strategic importance.

But the development of supply chain management courses to support these industry professionals is a recent phenomenon.

Thanks to strong, continuous interest in the discipline, however, candidates are now spoilt for choice with courses from undergraduate through to post graduate and Masters levels.

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Alan Phelan, CEO SourceDogg

Driving supply chain innovation

eProcurement can streamline the supply chain and drive real process improvements.

eProcurement is not new.  It’s been around since the early 1990s when market analysts and protagonists alike predicted a revolution in how future business-to-business transactions would take place.

Those early predictions may have been somewhat premature, as adoption levels remain modest to this day.

But with more intense pressure on industry competitiveness and a greater acceptance of software as a service (SaaS), more organisations are looking to eProcurement as a potential source of process efficiency and supply chain value.

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Simon Bell commercial manager, SAGE

Through the looking glass

Increased transparency in the supply chain is just one of the challenges faced by suppliers and demanded by customers.

Supply chain management is a complex business.  Faced with increasing globalisation and calls by consumers for more socially responsible procurement policies, organisations are struggling to build supply chains to meet the challenges of these competing demands.

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John Bergin, managing director, IT Force

Moving to virtualisation 3.0

Virtualisation has been around since the 1960s. But there are diverse levels of technology adoption across the market.

Virtualisation has been part of the computing landscape for decades now.  In fact the technology has been around in one guise or another since the 1960s when IBM first introduced its Control Program/Cambridge Monitor System (CP/CMS), allowing users to run an isolated system within one computing environment. Read more